Harpsichord Block Assembly Line

I got on a roll! And I’ve been sewing these little harpsichord blocks so much faster than I was when I initially began making them that it almost feels like a little assembly line, but if it’s an assembly line it’s a fun one as each little block is so cute! Since I finished that one that I found that was partially finished, I’ve now done – count ’em – eight more.

A peach one.

One green and one blue one.

Some purple ones.

A red one.

Finally – of course there are some pink ones.

I waited to press them until I had a few so now that they’re pressed I’ll quickly grade the seams, which I do find much easier after they’re pressed, and then they can get added to the group of completed blocks. Someone asked the other day – I use the Karen Kay Buckley 4″ serrated scissors when I’m grading the seams. I find those scissors are my absolute favourites for cutting fabric, whether it be grading seams or when I cut curved pieces to sew.

I’ve found a speedier piecing sequence that is making these faster to sew and involves lots of continuous piecing. I think Friday’s post may just be about the stitching sequence as I’ll undoubtedly be putting these down as soon as the Ribbon Flower collection is released and who knows for how long. So having that post to go back to, to remind myself of the sewing sequence, will be really helpful.

Why might the Harpsichord Quilt project be on the shelf for a longer time than I anticipated? Because Linda showed, on the Inklingo Facebook page, an alternate block that can be made with an extra shape that’s going to be included in the collection which is going to undoubtedly mean that I have two types of peonies in my Peony Quilt – some made with double sunflowers and others with that alternate Ribbon Flower. So somehow I think that the Harpsichord blocks are going to take a longer time-out than anticipated. But until the Ribbon Flower collection is released, I’m going to try to stick with the Harpsichord Quilt project and see if I can get at least another 10 blocks finished. I tried picking up the Stormy Seas unfinished block and just couldn’t get excited about piecing it. Hopefully, once the Peony Quilt gets really going, I will find I want to go back to Stormy Seas as well.

“Minuet in Double Time”

Another find in the camera was this shot Mr. Q.O. took in the spring of Baxter and Jake snoozing in the kitty tree, aka bunk beds.

16 thoughts on “Harpsichord Block Assembly Line

    • Thank you! I know I’m going to love that Harpsichord Quilt when it finally gets done – whenever that might be! And now that I’ve found a speedier stitching sequence, I don’t think it’s going to be a WIP forever. The bunk beds shot of the kitties made me laugh.

      Like

    • The Harpsichord Quilt blocks are more fun to sew than I remembered – that’s for sure! I’m really enjoying putting them together. I love that shot of the kitties in their bunk beds.

      Cathi

      >

      Like

    • I think once I really get started on the peonies I’ll be lost and only want to work on them! Although, that said, I am really having fun making the little harpsichord blocks!

      Cathi

      >

      Like

    • They are – they’re sort of happy little blocks to be sewing! Especially now that I’ve discovered what is, for me, a faster way of sewing them.

      Cathi

      >

      Like

    • If you love hand piecing, you will absolutely love Inklingo!! It is a hand-piecer’s dream come true!! All you need is a computer (Windows or Mac), Adobe Reader (free), and an Inkjet printer. It is so much easier than you probably imagine that you’ll be amazed! Iron fabric to freezer paper, feed through your printer and you have perfect shapes with the cutting and sewing lines as well as matching points printed right on the back of your fabrics.

      The best starting point is the free Diamond Triangle Square shape collection because it includes the first chapter of The Inklingo Handbook (pages H5 – H48) and some great shapes to print on fabric.

      Like

  1. I remember you working on a harpsichord quilt Years ago. Showing me photos of antique harpsichords . I love that you are posting more And seem so busy and sewing away.

    Love love love this cartoon!!!! Gosh they’ve been exceptionally good Lately! So funny and creative and smart.

    >

    Like

    • The Harpsichord Quilt project sat neglected for a long time! It was years and years ago that I started it – I don’t even want to think about how long ago!

      Cathi

      >

      Like

    • With all the quilts I want to make, I need to be stitching as fast as the music! The more I can get done now, before the Ribbon Flower collection comes out, the better – that way, when I do get back to this, it won’t feel quite as daunting as it did when I first picked up that project box and looked in!

      Cathi

      >

      Like

  2. Hi Cathi! I read your piece about grading seams and found it interesting.  I understand if you are hand quilting you want as little resistance as possible, but I’m wondering, why you grade the top seam and not the bottom.  I would think that since the bottom seam is folded over that, grading that seam would be the most logical.  The top seam is flat with no fold and , to me, would seem less secure than the folded one.   Have you tried trimming the folded seam?  Thoughts? Thanks,  Yuki p.s.  I always love seeing photos of your kitties.  I miss the other boys, they were charmers.  I have 2 Mainers and they are the joy of my life.  🙂  Quilting – still cheaper than therapy!

    Like

    • I would never grade the bottom seam unless the top fabric was the lightest of the pair. Grading the bottom seam would always let the top seam fabric shadow through, which is why, I think, that I just automatically grade that top seam all the time. I’ve never really thought about grading the bottom seam before as it’s so much easier to grade the top seam. I will give it a try the next time I”m grading some seams and see what I think.

      I miss the other two Maine Coons as well – Smudge and Lester were very special, but Baxter is a wonderful Maine Coon with his own personality. If I could, I’d adopt another red Maine Coon in a heartbeat. They are SO gorgeous!!

      Like

I love reading your comments!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s