Adventures in Hexagons Blog Tour & A Giveaway

adventures-in-hexes-candt

I was delighted when Emily Breclaw (The Caffeinated Quilter) asked me to be a part of the blog tour to promote her book Adventures in Hexagons, published by C&T Publishing. I met Emily through the Inklingo/EQ “Love the Lines” contest over five years ago, in which she won first place with her Tumbling Snowflakes design – a design that was based on hexagon-related shapes, and have followed her blog and her adventures with hexagons ever since.

Adventures in Hexagons is full of inspiration and tips for sewing her designs using hexagons and shapes related to hexagons, such as 60-degree diamonds and kites, all designs that make it very clear that hexagon and hexagon-related quilts are a lot of fun to sew! The cover design is one to which I was immediately drawn.

11177_Breclaw_Sp'17

As was this one.

11177 Breclaw S'17

And this one. I can envision them done as baby quilts.

I’ve made a few quilts based on hexagons and hexagon-related shapes and have some favourite tools that I use. The first and my favourite tool is Inklingo, which I use to print shapes on the back of my fabrics.

printer

The second is this – an ordinary inkjet printer. All I need is freezer paper to which I iron my pre-washed fabric as I use Inklingo collections to print shapes right on the back of my fabrics. I feed the fabric/freezer paper through the printer and …

printed fabric

…a few seconds later, I have perfect shapes printed with both the sewing and cutting lines as well as matching points clearly marked.

Hexagons

In another minute or two, after some quick rotary cutting, I had a nice stack of 30 hexagons all ready to be sewn. No basting, no adding any sort of matching points as they’re printed right on the backs of my fabrics. I used a much darker ink colour than I normally would for these as I wanted to ensure the lines would show up well in photographs.

My Sewing Tools

My other favourite tools, and all I need to sew hexagons or any shapes, are my favourite thread, a finger pincushion, two #12 sharps and thread snips. Now I’ve got everything I need to sew whatever design I wish.

For those of you who are regular readers and also use Inklingo, the designs in Adventures in Hexagons identify the size of the shapes by the finished side measurement – just as Inklingo collections are named. So it’s very easy to figure out just what Inklingo collections you might need to sew almost all of Emily’s designs.

Now for the giveaway. Today, two copies of Adventures in Hexagons are being given away. C&T Publishing will send an electronic version of the book to a winner who lives in the U.S. and Emily has generously offered to send a softcover copy to a winner who lives outside the U.S.

So leave a comment, letting me know in which country you reside, to be entered in the giveaway! I’ll announce the winners’ names on August 6, 2017.

Be sure to follow along the Adventures in Hexagons blog tour:

July 24 – C&T Publishing

July 25 – Generation Q Magazine

July 27 – Marti Mitchell

July 28 – Clothworks Fabrics

July 29 – Quilt Obsession (you’re here)

July 30 – Paper Pieces

August 1 – Mary Huey

August 2 – Linda Franz

August 3 – Patty Murphy

August 4 – Cheryl Sleboda

August 5 – Wendy Sheppard

August 6 – Emily Breclaw

Edited to Add:

Comments are now closed and the winners have been chosen.  Valerie S., who left a comment on August 3 @ 4:01 p.m., is the U.S. winner who will receive an copy of the book from the publisher.  Cherryl Barron, who left a comment on July 29 @9:29 a.m., is the international winner to whom Emily, the author of Adventures in Hexagons, will send a paper copy of the book. I have sent e-mails to both winners asking for their addresses. Congratulations!!

82 thoughts on “Adventures in Hexagons Blog Tour & A Giveaway

  1. What a wonderful new book! Look at those gorgeous quilts! I’d love to win this beauty and sit with A cup of tea deciding what to make first! As you know, I’m an American, so it would have to be mailed. I do love your blog so cathi!

    Sandra

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  2. I love hexies. Do you buy packages of freezer paper already cut for the printer or cut your own. I live in the United States. Thanks for the giveaway and hosting it. This is exciting.

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    • I don’t use papers at all. Printing my templates on to the back of my fabric with Inklingo means I have perfect stitching lines and matching points printed right on the back of my fabrics so I sew using a simple running stitch. No basting, no whipstitching. Just print, cut and sew – no papers to deal with at all! If I preferred English Paper Piecing, I could use the appropriate Inklingo hexagon collection to print my templates myself on to paper and cut those with the perfect cutting lines and, as the collection is yours to print however many you need whenever you need, you would never run out of papers.

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  3. Sorry if this is a second comment by me. I’ve gone to all the previous blogs after starting here and can’t remember if I left a comment here already. 🙂
    I’m in the US and I love hexies!!!!

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  4. Have been following your wonderful blog with the Inklingo ribbon flowers and love the pics of your feline friends too. I am from Perth, Western Australia and am an Inklingoist too but not as prolific as you just yet, have just started a Patchwork of the Crosses Quilt and am enjoying the hand piecing relaxation too.

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    • Thank you! I’m glad to hear you’ve been enjoying my blog and hope you come back often! Hand piecing is so relaxing, isn’t it? Particularly with the knowledge that having Inklingo print the perfect stitching lines and matching points makes it so very easy to make perfect blocks every time. Patchwork of the Crosses is a fabulous quilt – and there are so many possibilities with fussy cutting that it’s almost impossible to not want to make more than one!

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  5. Oh my goodness- love your ribbon flowers and that gorgeous blue star quilt!! I have the Adventures in Hexagons book and it is amazing! So glad the blog hop brought me to your site!!

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  6. Such a lovely book. I enjoy paper piecing, and just ventured in the world of hexes. I’m proud to say that I live in the USA.

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    • Using Inklingo is very, very easy. Iron fabric to freezer paper, print, cut and then sew with a simple running stitch. There’s lots and lots of Inklingo hexagon collections, ranging in size from .25” all the way up to 3” ones.

      Cathi

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    • Inklingo is easy! Just iron fabric to freezer paper, print, cut and sew with a simple running stitch. No basting, no whipstitching and no papers to remove.

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    • This is all very interesting. The use of Inklingo is a surprise itself. I think I may finally tackle a hexi project. I live in the USA. Thanks.
      Replies:RobinR@kleinnest.com

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      • Inklingo makes sewing hexagons so much fun – no basting, no whipstitching and no papers to remove. Just iron fabric to freezer paper, print, cut and sew with a simple running stitch. There are a lot of Inklingo hexagon collections available, all the way from .25″ to 3″ ones. You can see them all at the main Inklingo hexagon page

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  7. Did someone say “hexagon”? You are calling my name. O Canada, I hear you in the Pacific NW of the USA. Thank you and tummy tickles.

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  8. Ribbons and the Toon had a holiday today?? I see how those registration marks make your hand piecing so exact. Lovely designs, the teal with grey is stunning. I am way down south in New Zealand, in the middle of our winter.

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  9. I live in NY and have the AC running right now. Pretty soon, though, it will start to get chilly and I’ll pick up my needle to do hand piecing again. It’s what calms and centers me. I’ve never tried Inklingo, but I love Linda and Monkey!

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    • If you love hand piecing, you’ll love Inklingo! It’s very simple – just iron fabric to freezer paper, print, cut and sew. Linda and Monkey are the best!!

      Cathi

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  10. LOVE your blue star quilt!!!!! I also have the wonderful book, but I am really enjoying the blog hop! Thanks for making the Inklingo look so easy- can’t wait to try it!!

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    • Thank you! I made the blue and white quilt using Inklingo! Using Inklingo is very simple – just iron fabric to freezer paper, print, cut and sew with a simple running stitch – no basting, no whipstitching and no papers to remove! Having the perfect stitching lines and matching points makes it very easy to sew a perfect block every time!

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  11. My goodness Cathi, your blog is so international. Please exclude me from the contest as I can’t do handwork at this time. However that doesn’t stop me from enjoying your wonderful creations.

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    • Printing on fabric using Inklingo is very easy. Just iron paper to freezer paper, print using an ordinary inkjet printer, cut and sew using a simple running stitch. No basting, no whipstitching and no papers to remove. There are a lot of Inklingo hexagon collections, ranging in size from .25” all the way to 3”.

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  12. I NEED this book!!!! What a fun blog tour! And really cool to see where all your readers/commenters live. I’m here in HOT Texas, USA!

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  13. I live in the States. It’s such fun to see where everyone lives–quilters from all over are following this blog hop, and why not? This book looks wonderful!

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  14. I’d love to make a Hexie project… something small to learn the technique would be fun! I’m in Canada.

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    • Using Inklingo is not even really a technique – it’s just a matter of ironing paper to freezer paper, feeding it through an ordinary inkjet printer, and then cutting and then sew with a simple running stitch. No basting, no whipstitching, no papers to remove. There are lots and lots of Inklingo hexagon collections available, all the way from .25” up to 3” ones.

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  15. Just getting into Hexies so would love the book.
    I live in Australia and enjoy following all the comments and creative ideas shared.
    Thanks

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    • Inklingo really is fabulous for hexagons and many, many other shapes. You get perfect shapes printed on the back of your fabrics every time with precision cutting, stitching lines and matching points! There are a lot of different Inklingo hexagon collections, ranging from .25″ all the way up to 3″.

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  16. I really want to try Inklingo for hexagons. It would be a faster way to cut out shapes. I use a running stitch instead of EPP anyway, so think it would suit me. I live in Texas in the USA.

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    • If you prefer a running stitch, you’ll love Inklingo! The perfect cutting, stitching lines and matching points printed on the backs of your fabrics make it so easy to get perfect results every time. There are lots of Inklingo hexagon collections, ranging from .25″ all the way up to 3″ ones.

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    • Inklingo is a fabulous tool for quilters – and there are many, many shape collections. Virtually everything I’ve shown on my blog has been made with shapes I’ve printed with Inklingo. There are lots of Inklingo hexagon collections ranging from .25″ all the way up to 3″ ones.

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  17. Pingback: All About Inklingo » Blog Archive » Emily’s Adventures in Hexagons Giveaway!

  18. New to Hexies and using paper….I need a better way…sounds like Inklingo is the way! Lenore from Homewood Illinois USA

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  19. I am a hexagon girl from Down Under. Need a push to get into Inklingo. Have been stalking for some time. This book would get my printer going!

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  20. I love how you have made the process sound so simple…and it is! I love Inklingo and I love your site. Home is Albany, Western Australia. xx

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    • Printing on fabric with Inklingo is very, very easy! And it makes hexagons of any sort, including those in the Lucy Boston quilt, so much more fun – just a simple running stitch. No papers, no basting and no whipstitching!

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  21. I love hexagon & Inklingo, I have made one Grandmother’s Flower Garden. My next project is Patchwork of the Cross, I’m collecting fabrics right now. My next favorite things is quilting books. I’m from Houston, Texas home of Quilt Festival, I have been to everyone for the last 30 years!

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  22. I have recently become a fan of hexagons and hand piecing. Looks like Emily has created some fun patterns for us to enjoy. C&T Pub publishes some of my favorite books! I live in the United States.

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  23. I would be so excited if I win this book! I am retiring next month and will have loads of time to play.

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  24. Seeing the printed sheets from Inklingo makes me think I need to look into this! I’m sure it makes hexies a much easier project! I would love to see the top hexagon quilt made into baby form! USA born and living!

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    • Inklingo really does makes sewing hexagons so much easier and more fun! No papers, no basting, no whipstitching – just sewing using a simple running stitch with perfect stitching lines and matching points. There are lots of Inklingo hexagon collections, in sizes ranging all the way from .25″ up to 3″.

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